militarization

Brazil Military Deployment in Rio Shows Past Failures of Militarization

Brazil’s defense minister has announced a new phase of security operations in Rio de Janeiro that will involve a massive military deployment, a strategy often used throughout Latin America that has repeatedly failed to produce long-term improvements…

This piece was co-authored with Parker Asmann. Read it in its entirety at InSight Crime.

Mexico’s War on Crime: A Decade of (Militarized) Failure

This week marks ten years since Mexico‘s government embarked on a militarized campaign against the country’s criminal organizations, but while many criminal leaders have been captured or killed, a decade of confrontation has failed to substantially improve the nation’s security situation…

Read this piece in its entirety at InSight Crime.

Honduras Security Agreement with Israel Raises Human Rights Concerns

Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernández announced that he is requesting congressional approval for a new military cooperation agreement with Israel, raising human rights concerns given past experiences of Latin American countries receiving security assistance from the Mediterranean nation…

Read this piece in its entirety at InSight Crime.

SouthCom Commander Backs Military Involvement in Fighting Crime

The top US military officer in Latin America and the Caribbean recently praised the involvement of the region’s armed forces in fighting organized crime, a controversial stance likely rooted in the politics surrounding US security assistance to foreign countries…

Read this piece in its entirety at InSight Crime.

Argentina Militarizing Fight Against Crime with Help from US, Israel

Argentina’s government is cooperating with the United States and Israel as it pushes ahead with an increasingly militarized approach to internal security, despite the uneven track record this type of strategy has had in other Latin American countries…

Read this piece in its entirety at InSight Crime.

The Militarization of Policing in Latin America: A Critique

With perceptions of citizen insecurity on the rise in the world’s most violent region, many Latin American countries have begun calling on their militaries to play a larger role in combating crime and violence. But a recent panel of experts questioned the efficacy of this approach and highlighted numerous potential drawbacks to tasking military forces with roles usually assigned to civilian police…

Read this piece in its entirety at LobeLog.