drug policy

Weekly InSight: Drugs and Security, Latin America’s Lessons for the World

In our August 3 Facebook Live session, Senior Editor Mike LaSusa spoke with Brookings Institution Senior Fellow Vanda Felbab-Brown about the lessons Latin America has learned in its decades-long fight against drug-related violence, and how those lessons fit into the global context…

Read this piece in its entirety at InSight Crime. You can watch the full live stream below:

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U.S. Tolerates But Won’t Support Bolivia’s “Coca Yes, Cocaine No” Policy

Last month, the White House called out Bolivia for “failing demonstrably” to comply with international anti-drug agreements for the seventh year in a row. Out of the 22 nations labeled major players in the global drug trade, Bolivia, the only country that permits nationwide legal coca cultivation, was also the only one denied U.S. State Department-managed anti-narcotics aid for the second year in a row. The White House claims it cut funding “due to a lack of sufficient cooperation from the Bolivian government.” While evidence suggests the country might be becoming a bigger player in the international drug trade, the determination has more to do with politics than actual coca cultivation or amount of cocaine trafficked…

This piece was co-authored with Angelika Albaladejo. Read it in its entirety at Security Assistance Monitor.

 

Colombia Officials Continue to Signal Major Changes in Drug Policy

On August 22, in the first of ten drug policy forums to be held around the country, Colombian Justice Minister Yesid Reyes expressed his belief that the nation must find “more efficient” policies than prohibition and imprisonment to deal with drug use. “The evaluation that should be made is how much has imprisonment affected the control of drug use and the answer seems to be that its impact is minimal,” he said…

Read this piece in its entirety at Security Assistance Monitor.