coca

Weekly InSight: Colombia’s Criminal Dynamics and Allegations against Honduras Elites

In our March 23 Facebook Live session, Senior Editor Mike LaSusa moderated a discussion with Co-director Jeremy McDermott and Senior Investigator Héctor Silva Ávalos about two of the biggest organized crime stories in Latin America this week: the evolving criminal dynamics in Colombia as the peace process with the FARC unfolds, and the explosive allegations leveled by a confessed drug trafficker against numerous Honduran elites…

Read this piece in its entirety at InSight Crime. You can watch the full live stream below:

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Talking about Colombia Coca Production on InSight Crime’s “Weekly InSight”

I joined Senior Investigators Deborah Bonello and Héctor Silva Ávalos for InSight Crime’s weekly Facebook Live session today, where we discussed new White House estimates of coca production in Colombia, the future of the Sinaloa Cartel after “El Chapo,” and the close ties between elites and organized crime in Latin America. You can watch the full video at this link, or embedded below:

US Estimates Highest-Ever Colombia Coca Production

New US government estimates of coca production in Colombia indicate the South American country is growing more of the drug-producing crop than ever before, a development that is likely driving changes in underworld dynamics across the Americas and the globe…

Read this piece in its entirety at InSight Crime.

Colombia Continues to Grapple with Expanding Coca Cultivation

The Colombian government is doubling down on efforts to contain the expanding cultivation of coca crops, underscoring some of the persistent difficulties associated with combating the country’s illicit drug trade…

Read this piece in its entirety at InSight Crime.

U.S. Tolerates But Won’t Support Bolivia’s “Coca Yes, Cocaine No” Policy

Last month, the White House called out Bolivia for “failing demonstrably” to comply with international anti-drug agreements for the seventh year in a row. Out of the 22 nations labeled major players in the global drug trade, Bolivia, the only country that permits nationwide legal coca cultivation, was also the only one denied U.S. State Department-managed anti-narcotics aid for the second year in a row. The White House claims it cut funding “due to a lack of sufficient cooperation from the Bolivian government.” While evidence suggests the country might be becoming a bigger player in the international drug trade, the determination has more to do with politics than actual coca cultivation or amount of cocaine trafficked…

This piece was co-authored with Angelika Albaladejo. Read it in its entirety at Security Assistance Monitor.