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LaSusa v. Antrim County

The Northern Express, a weekly magazine based in Traverse City, Michigan, covered my lawsuits against the Michigan State Police and Antrim County:

LaSusa and his father, Lawrence LaSusa, a Traverse City attorney … [have] sued Antrim County and the state police in an effort to get the courts to agree with their interpretation of Michigan’s FOI Act — which mandates that police agencies can’t charge for police reports when those reports are released for the common good…

Read the full article by Patrick Sullivan at the Northern Express.

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InSight Crime’s Favorite Fan Mail of 2017

As 2017 comes to a close, InSight Crime takes a look back at some of our favorite interactions with our audience this year. Some are genuinely nice thank you notes or even  praise. Others are profanity-laced tirades about perceived biases or shortcomings in our coverage. And some are just plain weird…

Read this piece in its entirety at InSight Crime.

Did Sean Penn’s Meeting With El Chapo Help Authorities Track Down the Kingpin?

When Mexican authorities captured Sinaloa Cartel leader Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán in January 2016, they suggested that their success stemmed in part from an October 2015 meeting the kingpin held with Hollywood star Sean Penn and Mexican actress Kate del Castillo. Now, extensive reporting by InSight Crime combined with evidence presented in a new documentary film series has called into question details of various narratives surrounding these events…

This piece was co-authored with Parker Asmann. Read it in its entirety at InSight Crime.

Independent Journalist Sues Michigan State Police, Antrim County for Non-Compliance With Freedom of Information Act

Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
October 9, 2017
For more information, contact Mike LaSusa:  mikelasusa1@gmail.com


Independent Journalist Sues Michigan State Police, Antrim County for Non-Compliance With Freedom of Information Act 

Independent journalist Mike LaSusa has filed lawsuits alleging that the Michigan State Police and Antrim County are attempting to block the public’s access to records concerning a controversial murder-suicide case by charging excessive fees that are unlawful under Michigan’s Freedom of Information Act.

LaSusa, a journalist who has covered crime and security issues in the United States and abroad for several years, is seeking public records related to the case of Anne Avery Miller, a resident of northern lower Michigan who was criminally charged for her son Sam’s 2007 murder and later committed suicide while in the custody of Antrim County police. (The State Police were also involved in this investigation.)

The release of the requested records could help clarify the events surrounding Sam’s death as well as his mother’s jailhouse suicide, which involved alleged law enforcement incompetence throughout the investigation, prosecution and incarceration. Avery Miller and many of those close to her insisted that she was innocent of the crime with which she had been charged, and that her death was the result of improper behavior on the part of law enforcement and judicial officials.

Despite the fact that the release of the requested records would clearly serve the public interest, both Antrim County and the Michigan State Police have attempted to bar access to the records by charging excessive fees for processing this request.

LaSusa’s lawsuits seek to compel the disclosure of the records requested in this case. They also seek to establish a precedent for other citizens and journalists seeking records under the FOIA that are clearly in the public interest. Public bodies should not be allowed to stonewall access to records of public interest by charging excessive and unwarranted fees.

Mike LaSusa is represented by his father Lawrence LaSusa of LaSusa Law Offices in this matter. For more information, please contact Mike LaSusa by email at mikelasusa1@gmail.com.

Copies of the filed complaints are available below in PDF form.

Michigan State Police Complaint

Antrim County Complaint

Press Release

Weekly InSight: Can Hip Hop Help Stop Gang Violence in Latin America?

In our July 6 Facebook Live session, Senior Editor Mike LaSusa and independent journalist Angelika Albaladejo talked about her recent investigation of hip hop violence prevention programs throughout Latin America and the challenges they face in terms of implementation…

Read this piece in its entirety at InSight Crime. You can watch the full live stream below:

US Media Ignores Massive Scandals Surrounding Honduras President as He Visits Washington

The president of Honduras traveled to Washington, DC for a two-day official visit this week, and the mainstream US media completely ignored explosive charges leveled against the president’s brother, his political mentor, and other current and former Honduran elites.

During President Juan Orlando Hernández’s trip to Washington, he met with many of the top officials in the US government — which one would think would make this visit newsworthy in and of itself.

The president began his tour of Washington’s halls of power by meeting with several leading members of Congress, including Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, Kay Granger, Norma Torres, Bob Menendez, Marco Rubio, Bob Corker and Benjamin Cardin.

Hernández also met with other top US officials, including Department of Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly, who himself made many trips to Honduras as head of the US Southern Command from 2012 to 2015.

The Honduran president also met with Secretary of State Rex Tillerson as well as the head of the State Department’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement, William Brownfield.

He even met with Vice President Mike Pence.

But most major US media outlets completely ignored Hernández’s visit.

The New York Times … nothing:

The Washington Post … nothing:

Reuters … nothing:

The Associated Press … nothing:

The Wall Street Journal did not cover Hernández’s visit, either. But a few days earlier the news outlet ran a story that should have made the Honduran president’s visit a fairly big news story, even in the midst of such a crowded news cycle. But the Journal’s headline (“Trafficker says he met with the Honduran president’s brother”) downplays the explosive nature of the actual statements made by the trafficker in question.

As we reported on March 20 at InSight Crime, Devis Leonel Rivera Maradiaga, the former head of the drug trafficking group known as the “Cachiros” who later became a DEA informant, testified in a federal court in New York that not only had he met with President Hernández’s brother Tony, but that Tony had asked Rivera Maradiaga for bribes in exchange for making payments to a company controlled by the Cachiros organization.

To state it plainly, Rivera Maradiaga alleged that the brother of the current president of Honduras solicited bribes from a known drug trafficker. And he made those allegations just days before the president met with some of the top officials in the US government. And the US mainstream media said absolutely nothing about it.

But there’s more to the story. Not only did Rivera Maradiaga accuse President Hernández’s brother of having ties to organized crime, he had also testified earlier this month that he repeatedly bribed Hernández’s presidential predecessor and political mentor, Porfirio “Pepe” Lobo. (These allegations were made in testimony given at the trial of Pepe Lobo’s son, Fabio, who has pled guilty to drug trafficking charges in the New York court.)

It is remarkable, to say the least, that President Hernández could meet with so many of the most powerful people in the US government just days after these explosive allegations were made public, and that not one of those officials — and not a single major US media outlet — would raise the issue, even in passing.

(The Guardian provided some of the only mainstream coverage of Hernández’s visit, but that outlet’s article focused entirely on protesters heckling the president over his government’s handling of the investigation of the murder of prominent environmental activist Berta Cáceres.)

The lack of mainstream coverage of these allegations is particularly galling, considering the close relationship between the United States and Honduras, particularly with regard to security and law enforcement matters. It is disappointing that the US mainstream media has so utterly failed to inform the American people about significant developments that could affect public attitudes about the United States’ cooperation with and assistance to the Central American country — which is one of the most violent and corrupt in the region.