Paraguay

Weekly InSight: Mexico Violence, Money Laundering and Brazil-Paraguay Narco War

In our March 30 Facebook Live session, Senior Investigator Deborah Bonello and Senior Editor Mike LaSusa discussed some of the main stories that we covered this week: a wave of recent violence against journalists in Mexico, the importance of tackling illicit financial flows in the fight against organized crime, and a brewing narco war on the border between Brazil and Paraguay…

Read this piece in its entirety at InSight Crime. You can watch the full live stream below:

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Is Gang War in Brazil Behind Recent Violence in Paraguay?

A recent spate of violence on the border between Brazil and Paraguay suggests a battle for control of drug trafficking routes in the area, but it remains unclear whether the killings are related to a wider gang war that has roiled Brazil in recent months…

Read this piece in its entirety at InSight Crime.

Killing on Brazil-Paraguay Border Is Latest Sign of Narco War

The murder of a convicted drug kingpin’s brother on the border between Brazil and Paraguay is the latest indication of an ongoing battle for control of lucrative drug trafficking routes in the area, which is well known for violence and corruption linked to the narcotics trade…

Read this piece in its entirety at InSight Crime.

Recent Scandals Highlight Paraguay’s Narco-Corruption Problem

The U.S. removed Paraguay from its list of major narcotics transit or producing countries in September 2010 because illicit substances from there are mostly “trafficked to the neighboring countries of Brazil, Argentina, Chile and Uruguay but not to the United States.” Still, it would be a mistake for the U.S. ignore narcocorruption in Paraguay just because drugs from there don’t usually end up in the United States…

Read this piece in its entirety at Security Assistance Monitor.

Small rebel group causing Paraguay big headaches

Although the Paraguayan People’s Army (EPP) only has an estimated 20 to 100 combatants, the government of President Horacio Cartes has made it a top security priority. Cartes did not seem very concerned with the group when he was inaugurated in August 2013, but after a series of high-profile attacks by the rebels early in his term, he called in the military to help the police confront them…

Read this piece in its entirety at Southern Pulse.